Crane Institute of America

Know Your Ground Conditions

Posted on February 23, 2015 • Comments Off on Know Your Ground Conditions

A crawler crane erecting wind turbines in Canada last fall turned over while traveling from one to another. Witnesses reported “The crane was moving over the wet and uneven ground when the tracks appear to have sunk at the back, causing the crane to overturn backward.”

Crane over at Canadian wind farm

Cranes must be set up and travel on firm, level ground. Ground conditions are even more critical with long boom cranes like this one, which had 120 meters (about 394 feet) of boom.

It is not surprising that this crane sunk at the rear, since it was in heavy lift configuration where counterweights range from 250,000 to one million pounds along with the weight of the mast mounted to the rear. It is doubtful that the manufacturer of the crane approved traveling in this configuration, but if they did they would specify firm level ground throughout the route of travel.

Thankfully no one was injured in this incident. This story and photos originally appeared on Heavy Lift News.


Dangerous Proposal

Posted on February 16, 2015 • Comments Off on Dangerous Proposal

Valentine’s Day was this past weekend, a popular day for marriage proposals. In the fall of 2014, a man in the Netherlands attempted an ill-advised but very memorable proposal involving a mobile crane.

Crane overturn Netherlands proposal

For reasons we may not ever know, a man wanted to be lifted in a personnel basket using a crane over a row of houses to propose marriage to his girlfriend. The crane he was suspended from overturned, falling into the house; and when cranes were brought in to recover it, the rigging slipped and dropped the boom into the roof again, causing further damage. Thankfully no one was hurt (although there was significant property damage), but we should learn from their crane-related mistakes:

  1. The crane was not properly set up.
    a. The right rear (street side) outrigger was fully extended, but the front right was not and there didn’t seem to be a reason (the street was already blocked off).
    b. The left front outrigger was fully extended, but the left rear was not because a parked car was in the way.
  2. They had two cranes on site that could be used to upright the crane that had tipped.
    a. Two cranes should be used to upright a crane: one to raise the boom side and the other to lower the other side.
    b. It wasn’t clear from the video whether they were using the second crane, because there appeared to be a hesitation in hoisting the boom. That allowed the sling to loosen and slide up the boom.
    c. This problem is typical of trying to upright a crane using only one crane. When the crane being lifted goes over center it will attempt to upright itself quickly and its boom would jerk up.
    d. When the sling slid up the boom, the crane started to tip again; shock loading the sling and breaking it.
  3. In the United States, OSHA would not be required to respond to this incident because
    a. They were not using the crane and basket for work, so it is regulated by the states as “entertainment” like carnival rides or bungee jumping from a crane basket.
    b. Even if OSHA had jurisdiction, they would not investigate this incident because there was only property damage and no serious injury or death.

(Story from Vertikal.net and Heavy Lift News)


Journeyman to Directors, Crane Institute of America Offers New Crane and Rigging Training Courses for all Skill Levels

Posted on February 12, 2015 • Comments Off on Journeyman to Directors, Crane Institute of America Offers New Crane and Rigging Training Courses for all Skill Levels

January 26, 2015 (Sanford, Fla.) – Crane Institute of America has long focused on providing technical training for equipment operators and riggers, but as ASME and OSHA standards have evolved, placing greater emphasis on the responsibilities of other crew members, Crane Institute has expanded its available training programs.

“There is an increasing need for formal training for other crew members, such as Assembly/Disassembly Directors, Lift Directors, Master Riggers, and Site Supervisors,” said Jim Headley, President of Crane Institute.

The newest training program to join Crane Institute’s Management Training Curriculum is the four-day Lift Director/Lift Planner course. The first open-enrollment classes will be held in March at Crane Institute’s headquarters in Sanford, Fla.

The course identifies the responsibilities of the people involved in the lift and outlines ASME and OSHA requirements for Lift Directors, including Site Supervisor responsibilities, and Lift Planners. Among the topics covered are pre-lift requirements, avoiding hazards, special lifting operations, and how to plan a lift from start to finish.

Among the materials attendees will receive are a lift director/lift planner workbook, a mobile crane lift planning form, and two handbooks – Mobiles Cranes and Rigging.

Journeyman and Master Riggers

In addition, Crane Institute is in the process of updating its rigger training programs to ensure that the Rigger/Signalperson program is on a Journeyman level.  The course will remain a two-day class. Likewise, the ‘Advanced Rigger’ program is undergoing a name change to ‘Master Rigger,’ which currently covers inspection, moving loads vertically, horizontally, and up inclines, determining load weight, calculating sling loads, and multi-crane lifts. “Both the Rigger/Signalperson and Master Rigger programs are designed to meet corporate and municipal requirements,” said Headley. Students will have the option to conclude the course by taking applicable Crane Institute Certification (CIC) exams.

Crane Institute of America launches a new four-day Lift Director/Lift Planner course, and provides Rigger/Signalperson and Master Rigger courses to meet corporate and municipal requirements.

Crane Institute of America launches a new four-day Lift Director/Lift Planner course, and provides Rigger/Signalperson and Master Rigger courses to meet corporate and municipal requirements. Click here for high resolution image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Crane Institute

For almost 30 years Crane Institute of America, Sanford, Fla., has offered training for operators, inspectors, safety managers, lift directors, and riggers and signalpersons working with mobile cranes, overhead cranes, tower cranes, aerial lift and forklifts. It is an authorized CIC written and practical exam testing site. For information, visit www.craneinstitute.com.

Media Contact
Tracy Bennett
Mighty Mo Media Partners, LLC.
tbennett@mightymomedia.com


Crane Institute of America Partners with Independent Trainers

Posted on January 29, 2015 • 1 Comment

January 26, 2015 (Sanford, Fla.) – A new Training Partnership program from Crane Institute of America is designed to provide independent crane and rigging trainers with the tools they need to prepare employees for qualification and/or certification. Crane Institute’s Training Partnership provides trainers with access to a professionally developed training program and curriculum with over 300 slides, videos and workbooks, backed by nearly 30 years of experience in sound training methods.

Prospective trainers are independent training consultants or trainers employed by contractors, utilities, the petro-chem industry, or other businesses with crane and rigging operations. Participating Training Partners integrate Crane Institute’s curriculum and materials into their own training departments.

“Why re-invent the wheel?” asks Jim Headley, President of Crane Institute of America. “Trends in risk management and stiffer regulatory requirements have increased demand for quality training. This program gives employers professional training resources at a fraction of the cost to develop your own program, while allowing the flexibility to customize to your specific needs,” he said.

The process is simple. Candidates attend Train-the-Trainer Programs of their choice to become proficient and certified as trainers by Crane Institute of America. Options include Mobile Crane, Small Crane (including Boom Trucks, Knuckleboom Cranes, Digger Derricks and Service Mechanic Trucks), Overhead Cranes, Forklifts, and Rigger/Signalperson Train-the-Trainer classes. In addition, a train-the-trainer course for Aerial Work Platforms will be introduced later in 2015.

Approved trainers, earning two-year credentials, can then purchase a license to use Crane Institute’s online training program, which can be used anywhere in the world. Training Partners have access to workbooks, training materials, and certificates, which can be co-branded with your company logo.

Train-the-Trainer courses range from three to seven days and open enrollment dates are available at our Orlando, Fla., facility. Alternatively, all Train-the-Trainer programs can be held at your facility and customized for your equipment and typical lifting activities.

A new Training Partnership from Crane Institute of America is designed for independent training consultants or trainers employed by contractors, utilities, the petro-chem industry, or other businesses with crane and rigging operations.

A new Training Partnership from Crane Institute of America is designed for independent training consultants or trainers employed by contractors, utilities, the petro-chem industry, or other businesses with crane and rigging operations. Click here for high resolution image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Crane Institute

For almost 30 years Crane Institute of America, Sanford, Fla., has offered training for operators, inspectors, safety managers, lift directors, and riggers and signalpersons working with mobile cranes, overhead cranes, tower cranes, aerial lift and forklifts. It is an authorized CIC written and practical exam testing site. For information, visit www.craneinstitute.com.

Media Contact
Tracy Bennett
Mighty Mo Media Partners, LLC
tbennett@mightymomedia.com


Bantam Crane

Posted on January 13, 2015 • Comments Off on Bantam Crane

20141226_144029TLow ResWhile vacationing, the Headleys decided to head to Bentonville, AR to tour the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art – an excursion that Mrs. Headley was particularly looking forward to. So the family loaded into the car, with Jim driving, and off they went. As they’re trucking down the road, something catches Jim’s eye. Not long after, the family has pulled off the road and is standing before an antique crane.

As Jim and his son are checking it out and snapping pictures, a beat up dump truck approaches. Mike Lewis, of Lewis Construction Company, gets out a heads towards Jim for an introduction. The two men spoke at length about the Schield Bantam crane. Lewis shared that it was built in 1951 or 1953 and any other details that he knew about the machine. Believe it or not, Lewis still uses the crane on the job.

After what seemed like hours to the Mrs., the family took their leave and continued their journey to the museum. However, isn’t it amazing how someone can begin their day one way, but an unexpected detour can bring them to a real treasure from American history?

Bantam Combined

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1963 Corvette Donated by Crane Institute of America to be Sold at Mecum Auctions for Charity

Posted on January 6, 2015 • Comments Off on 1963 Corvette Donated by Crane Institute of America to be Sold at Mecum Auctions for Charity

December 30, 2014 (Sanford, Fla.) – “I love old cars,” said Jim Headley, President and CEO of Crane Institute of America, “and missing an opportunity in 1974 to swap my worn-out Volkswagen plus $2,000 for an immaculate 1963 Corvette, has always haunted me. From that day on, it was on my bucket list to own a 1963 Corvette,” he said. Several years later he was able to check it off his list when he purchased a red ’63 Stingray.

“Although I love old cars, I love helping people more,” said Headley. In the spirit of giving and spreading joy in the New Year, Crane Institute is donating Headley’s beloved 1963 Chevy Corvette for auction, with proceeds to be distributed to five worthy charities. Assisting in this endeavor is Roger’s Corvette Center – a world renowned Corvette dealer in Central Florida – and Mecum Auctions, the largest classic car auctioneer in the United States.

Roger Judski, owner of Roger’s Corvette Center has been dealing in pre-owned Corvettes since 1965. His sales floor is like heaven-on-Earth for any Corvette enthusiast! Crane Institute displayed the 1963 Corvette at Roger’s for a short time before deciding to auction it, at Judski’s recommendation. Crane Institute’s Corvette will be auctioned at the world’s largest collector car auction held annually in Kissimmee, Fla., January 16-25, 2015.

The Charities

Five charities have been selected by Crane Institute of America, Roger’s Corvette Center, and Mecum Auctions.

  • The Russell Home for Atypical Children, chosen by Roger’s Corvette Center, has been helping children with handicaps that interfere with their independence for over 60 years.
  • Mecum Auctions selected Curing Kids Cancer, which has funded research to find a cure for childhood cancer since 2004.

Selected to benefit from the auction proceeds by Crane Institute are Samaritan’s Purse, Caring People Recovery Center, and Wounded Warrior Project.

  • Samaritan’s Purse travels the world to help the needy in war, poverty or disease-stricken communities.
  • Caring People Recovery Center helps adults recovering from alcohol and drug addictions.
  • Wounded Warrior Project focuses on helping the brave service men and women who returned home injured.

The ‘Vette

The 1963 Corvette, sometimes referred to as the “Corvette Stingray,” is estimated to sell for $50,000 to $60,000. The body style used on this model was introduced in late 1962 and styled after a GM-built race car. The year the car was manufactured was the first time both convertible and coupe car bodies were offered by Chevrolet.

“Our Corvette is Riverside Red and has red vinyl interior, a white convertible top and matching red removable hard top. The paint matches color codes indicating it is original as delivered from the St. Louis, Mo., factory. The engine is the original 327/300 HP and 4-speed manual transmission,” said Headley.

For anyone interested in adding to their collection (or starting one) this is the perfect car for you. You can watch the auction on NBCSN, which is presently scheduled for Saturday, January 24. Look for lot S130.

“For 30 years, nearly 100,000 crane operators and riggers from across the country have chosen Crane Institute of America for their training and certification needs, making job sites across the nation safer and more productive. In honor of these men and women and in the spirit of giving, we hope this Corvette brings as much happiness to the buyer as to the well deserving charities,” said Headley.

About Crane Institute

For almost 30 years Crane Institute of America, Sanford, Fla., has offered training for operators, inspectors, safety managers, lift directors, and riggers and signalpersons working with mobile cranes, overhead cranes, tower cranes, aerial lift and forklifts. It is an authorized CIC written and practical exam testing site. For information, visit www.craneinstitute.com.

High Res Image – click here.

1963 Chevy Corvette Stingray


Shocking OSHA Statistics

Posted on January 6, 2015 • Comments Off on Shocking OSHA Statistics

If you are anything like me, then your desk is covered with sticky notes with reminders of what needs to be completed. These helpful reminders are a great solution to get the ‘busy’ work completed, but what about the important information?

Our infographic describes eye-opening statistics provided by OSHA. These statistics should be one everyone’s desks as a reminder to be safe and mindful when working.

Common OSHA Stats 2014


Corvette for a Cause

Posted on December 17, 2014 • 1 Comment

1963 CorvetteTLow Res
This holiday season, Crane Institute of America is in the spirit of giving. We will be donating a 1963 Chevrolet Corvette to be auctioned by Mecum Auction with television coverage in Kissimmee, FL in January 2015. All proceeds will be going to five charities. This is possible with help from Roger’s Corvette Center, which has an international reputation for providing some of the finest used Corvettes, and Mecum Auctions, the world leader of collector car sales, who was kind enough to auction our Corvette without charging.

Roger’s Corvette Center has chosen The Russell Home for Atypical Children as their charity. The Russell Home is based in Orlando, Florida and for over 60 years has been helping children whose handicap prevents them from functioning independently.

Curing Kids Cancer is Mecum Auctions’ charity of choice. Curing Kids Cancer funds research to find a cure for childhood cancer; since it was founded in 2004, it has raised over $5 million.

Crane Institute chose 3 charities: Samaritan’s Purse for helping those in need in war, poverty, or disease-stricken communities around the world; Caring People Recovery Center, which helps men and women recover from drug and alcohol addictions; and Wounded Warrior Project, which aids the men and women who bravely served our country and returned injured.

The red 4-speed convertible will be auctioned this January in Kissimmee, Florida as Lot S130. Watch the broadcast live on NBCSN from January 16-25, 2015.

Corvette Inside Low Res01 Rogers Low Res01


Webinar: Simulator Use in Crane Operator Training

Posted on December 9, 2014 • Comments Off on Webinar: Simulator Use in Crane Operator Training

December 11, 2014 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST

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Today’s training organizations and equipment operators are getting real results with simulation-based training.

Hear from Jim Headley, CEO of Crane Institute of America, and Steve Fryer, NCSG’s Manager of Training on how they deploy simulators to assess and build real skills. Learn how these industry leaders applied objective and consistent learning methodologies with simulation-based training.

Simulation-training gets proven results – faster time to competency, skilled and safe operators, and more effective assessment. If you are interested in improving your training methodologies and measuring operator skills then this is a must-attend event!

Click here to register for the Webinar!

Presenters
Jim Headley, CEO of Crane Institute of America
Steve Fryer, NCSG’s Manager of Training
Paolo Paoletta, CM Labs Simulations’ Industry Solutions Manager


Preparing for OSHA Inspections

Posted on November 20, 2014 • Comments Off on Preparing for OSHA Inspections

The thought of an OSHA Compliance Office visiting a construction site may make some cringe.

OSHA released a ‘directive for enforcing requirements of the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard.’ The purpose of the directive is to give OSHA personnel a basis on how to conduct their inspections at construction sites when equipment covered by Subpart CC are present.

The items outlined below are just the minimum a Compliance Office follows during their inspection. The officer can include items in the inspection from other applicable requirements if the reason for the inspection is a fatality, compliant/referral inspection, or if a hazardous condition is present.

Notepad-OSHA checklist 800px

  1. Are ground conditions adequate, including support/foundation, matting, cribbing, blocking, etc?
  2. Is there visibly apparent need for repairs of equipment?
  3. Are nearby power lines energized; what is the voltage; what is the crane’s working area; and what are the encroachment prevention procedures?
  4. Is a signal person used and do they have documentation of qualification, electronic or physical?
  5. Is the qualified signal person the one communicating with the operator?
  6. Are lift plans being followed, if used?
  7. If hoisting personnel, who determined it was necessary?
  8. Are meetings being conducting for working near power lines, A/D work or hoisting?
  9. Is all available rigging equipment compliant?
  10. Are load charts and OEM manual’s available for the specific equipment used?
  11. Is the operator qualified, trained and competent?
  12. Are equipment and wire rope inspections being conducted; by whom; and are they qualified?
  13. Are safety devices and operational aids functioning?
  14. Are there any visual deficiencies of hoisting equipment, components and load line?
  15. How is weight of load determined?
  16. Are qualified riggers being used for A/D work and when in the fall zone?
  17. Who is the A/D Director and are they present?
  18. Are oilers and mechanics qualified; are they communicating with the operator; and are they protected in hazardous areas?
  19. Are personal fall arrest systems in compliance?

Read more form OSHA

Attend our New Lift Director/Lift Planner training program and learn who is responsible in different situations, and never worry about OSHA knocking on the door again!