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OSHA’s Update on Operator Certification

Posted on May 28, 2015 • Comments Off on OSHA’s Update on Operator Certification

DOL Bldg DC w- creditMost of you who read this will be familiar with the draft proposed recently by OSHA regarding crane operator qualification which would replace the original wording of the 1926 (subpart CC) section 1427. This is the section where the operator certification and qualification requirements are covered. You can go to https://www.osha.gov/doc/accsh/accshcrane.pdf to read the entire proposed draft.

In a nutshell, the draft was a rewrite of what qualifies and/or certifies an equipment operator, which includes a variety of crane types. In particular, the draft as written would require an extensive annual evaluation of the operator and require that the operator attend a very strenuous training program. The ‘proposed draft’ changed the current wording which states that operators are to be “certified by type and capacity of equipment” to “operators are to be certified by type of equipment.”

As you might expect, there was an adverse reaction to this proposed draft, especially by employers of crane and equipment operators, since an annual evaluation of each operator would be extremely time-consuming and costly. Personally, I was not surprised by this proposed draft. I knew change was coming when OSHA extended the operator certification date because of the opposition of certain groups over operators having to be certified by type and capacity. Also, it was pretty obvious that OSHA had given serious thought to the subject of cranes, particularly to personnel who operate them, that certification did not equal qualification and there should be a greater emphasis on operator training, assessment and evaluation.

OSHA scheduled an ACCSH (Advisory Committee on Construction Safety and Health) meeting on March 2, to discuss the proposed draft. ACCSH is a 15-member advisory body that provides advice and assistance in construction and policy matters to the assistant secretary. ACCSH meetings are open to the public and are announced in the Federal Register. As you would expect, the room was full. CIC was represented by Tony Brown, Jeff Dudley, Pete Walsh and myself. Tony and I signed up to be speakers. When it came our time to speak, Tony and I both recommended to the ACCSH committee that the language requiring operators to be certified by type and capacity should remain in the regulation. We made this recommendation based on the following reasoning: half of the four accredited certification organizations (NCCER and CIC) developed their certification programs by type and capacity because OSHA said that would be the requirement. It just would not be fair to these organizations to change the original requirement for certification which was by type and capacity and force them to change their programs. That would not only be unfair, it defies common sense!

Tony and I both understand there are operators that have certifications which are based on type only. Requiring them to be certified by type and capacity would cause them to be disenfranchised. Therefore, we recommended to the ACCSH committee that not only should type and capacity be left in the regulation, but the regulation should also allow operators to be certified by type. The standard would ultimately read that operators of equipment be certified by type and capacity or by type. We felt like this would satisfy all of the certification organizations and would be fair to all of them as well.

The next day, the ACCSH committee recommended by motion several things to OSHA. First, that OSHA needs to rework the operator evaluation and re-evaluation language and that type and capacity be put back into the rewrite of 1427. This would result in operators having the choice of being certified by type and capacity or by type only. ACCSH also recommended that OSHA clarify whether a trainer be certified or certified and qualified and that OSHA develop some reasonable definition of who the controlling contractor would be on the job site.

I’ve always been a little skeptical of OSHA and its control in the workplace. However, after attending the ACCSH meeting I have a lot more respect for OSHA and what it does to protect workers. I was also very pleased with the meeting and have great admiration for the members of the ACCSH committee. Some of these members might not have even known what a crane was when the meeting first started, but they came up to speed very quickly and were very astute to the issues being presented. They made appropriate motions and recommendations to OSHA regarding the most important points of the proposed draft.

So this is what we can be assured of: OSHA is going to require that operators be evaluated on a periodic basis with signed documentation by an evaluator. There will be more stringent training requirements which will have to be documented along with the periodic evaluations. In other words, people will have to attend more of a professional type training program which covers the topics outlined in the proposed draft. It was also expressed that OSHA would like to get all of this done by year’s end. So now we just have to wait for OSHA to do their work and present another rewrite of what was previously proposed. It will then have to go through the process and hopefully by year’s end all of this can be done and this certification issue can be put to bed, and the industry can move forward in a direction that would help more men and women go home safely at the end of the work day.

James Headley
President & CEO
Crane Institute of America, LLC.


Journeyman to Directors, Crane Institute of America Offers New Crane and Rigging Training Courses for all Skill Levels

Posted on February 12, 2015 • Comments Off on Journeyman to Directors, Crane Institute of America Offers New Crane and Rigging Training Courses for all Skill Levels

January 26, 2015 (Sanford, Fla.) – Crane Institute of America has long focused on providing technical training for equipment operators and riggers, but as ASME and OSHA standards have evolved, placing greater emphasis on the responsibilities of other crew members, Crane Institute has expanded its available training programs.

“There is an increasing need for formal training for other crew members, such as Assembly/Disassembly Directors, Lift Directors, Master Riggers, and Site Supervisors,” said Jim Headley, President of Crane Institute.

The newest training program to join Crane Institute’s Management Training Curriculum is the four-day Lift Director/Lift Planner course. The first open-enrollment classes will be held in March at Crane Institute’s headquarters in Sanford, Fla.

The course identifies the responsibilities of the people involved in the lift and outlines ASME and OSHA requirements for Lift Directors, including Site Supervisor responsibilities, and Lift Planners. Among the topics covered are pre-lift requirements, avoiding hazards, special lifting operations, and how to plan a lift from start to finish.

Among the materials attendees will receive are a lift director/lift planner workbook, a mobile crane lift planning form, and two handbooks – Mobiles Cranes and Rigging.

Journeyman and Master Riggers

In addition, Crane Institute is in the process of updating its rigger training programs to ensure that the Rigger/Signalperson program is on a Journeyman level.  The course will remain a two-day class. Likewise, the ‘Advanced Rigger’ program is undergoing a name change to ‘Master Rigger,’ which currently covers inspection, moving loads vertically, horizontally, and up inclines, determining load weight, calculating sling loads, and multi-crane lifts. “Both the Rigger/Signalperson and Master Rigger programs are designed to meet corporate and municipal requirements,” said Headley. Students will have the option to conclude the course by taking applicable Crane Institute Certification (CIC) exams.

Crane Institute of America launches a new four-day Lift Director/Lift Planner course, and provides Rigger/Signalperson and Master Rigger courses to meet corporate and municipal requirements.

Crane Institute of America launches a new four-day Lift Director/Lift Planner course, and provides Rigger/Signalperson and Master Rigger courses to meet corporate and municipal requirements. Click here for high resolution image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Crane Institute

For almost 30 years Crane Institute of America, Sanford, Fla., has offered training for operators, inspectors, safety managers, lift directors, and riggers and signalpersons working with mobile cranes, overhead cranes, tower cranes, aerial lift and forklifts. It is an authorized CIC written and practical exam testing site. For information, visit www.craneinstitute.com.

Media Contact
Tracy Bennett
Mighty Mo Media Partners, LLC.
tbennett@mightymomedia.com


Crane Institute of America Partners with Independent Trainers

Posted on January 29, 2015 • 1 Comment

January 26, 2015 (Sanford, Fla.) – A new Training Partnership program from Crane Institute of America is designed to provide independent crane and rigging trainers with the tools they need to prepare employees for qualification and/or certification. Crane Institute’s Training Partnership provides trainers with access to a professionally developed training program and curriculum with over 300 slides, videos and workbooks, backed by nearly 30 years of experience in sound training methods.

Prospective trainers are independent training consultants or trainers employed by contractors, utilities, the petro-chem industry, or other businesses with crane and rigging operations. Participating Training Partners integrate Crane Institute’s curriculum and materials into their own training departments.

“Why re-invent the wheel?” asks Jim Headley, President of Crane Institute of America. “Trends in risk management and stiffer regulatory requirements have increased demand for quality training. This program gives employers professional training resources at a fraction of the cost to develop your own program, while allowing the flexibility to customize to your specific needs,” he said.

The process is simple. Candidates attend Train-the-Trainer Programs of their choice to become proficient and certified as trainers by Crane Institute of America. Options include Mobile Crane, Small Crane (including Boom Trucks, Knuckleboom Cranes, Digger Derricks and Service Mechanic Trucks), Overhead Cranes, Forklifts, and Rigger/Signalperson Train-the-Trainer classes. In addition, a train-the-trainer course for Aerial Work Platforms will be introduced later in 2015.

Approved trainers, earning two-year credentials, can then purchase a license to use Crane Institute’s online training program, which can be used anywhere in the world. Training Partners have access to workbooks, training materials, and certificates, which can be co-branded with your company logo.

Train-the-Trainer courses range from three to seven days and open enrollment dates are available at our Orlando, Fla., facility. Alternatively, all Train-the-Trainer programs can be held at your facility and customized for your equipment and typical lifting activities.

A new Training Partnership from Crane Institute of America is designed for independent training consultants or trainers employed by contractors, utilities, the petro-chem industry, or other businesses with crane and rigging operations.

A new Training Partnership from Crane Institute of America is designed for independent training consultants or trainers employed by contractors, utilities, the petro-chem industry, or other businesses with crane and rigging operations. Click here for high resolution image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Crane Institute

For almost 30 years Crane Institute of America, Sanford, Fla., has offered training for operators, inspectors, safety managers, lift directors, and riggers and signalpersons working with mobile cranes, overhead cranes, tower cranes, aerial lift and forklifts. It is an authorized CIC written and practical exam testing site. For information, visit www.craneinstitute.com.

Media Contact
Tracy Bennett
Mighty Mo Media Partners, LLC
tbennett@mightymomedia.com


Shocking OSHA Statistics

Posted on January 6, 2015 • Comments Off on Shocking OSHA Statistics

If you are anything like me, then your desk is covered with sticky notes with reminders of what needs to be completed. These helpful reminders are a great solution to get the ‘busy’ work completed, but what about the important information?

Our infographic describes eye-opening statistics provided by OSHA. These statistics should be one everyone’s desks as a reminder to be safe and mindful when working.

Common OSHA Stats 2014


Crane Operator Skills Competition to be Featured as World of Concrete Outdoor Event

Posted on December 18, 2014 • Comments Off on Crane Operator Skills Competition to be Featured as World of Concrete Outdoor Event

November 25, 2014 (Sanford, Fla.) — In cooperation with the 2015 World of Concrete show, Crane Institute Companies, CIC and Crane Institute of America, will bring two crane operator skills competitions to commercial concrete and masonry contractors, Feb. 3-5, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nev.

Making its debut is a Knuckleboom Crane Operator Challenge, which draws its skills assessment criteria from Crane Institute Certification’s articulating boom crane certification. Three knuckleboom crane operators—one each day of the Outdoor Gold Lot Events—will win cash and other prizes.

In addition, four telescopic boom crane operators will be selected as World of Concrete regional finalists for the Crane Operator & Rigger Skills Championship, to be held later in 2015. CIC began holding regional events hosted by CIC Practical Examiners and their partners in October 2014. CIC Regional Crane Operator & Rigger Skills Competitions continue through June 2015. Grand Prize for the Championship is $10,000.

Judges and CIC Practical Examiners from Crane Institute of America and other organizations will oversee both crane courses, which are designed to assess precision, depth perception, and load control. “Tasks will reflect typical activities experienced on real job sites, which is a defining characteristic of CIC certifications,” said Jim Headley, CEO of CIC and President of Crane Institute of America. In addition, operators will be evaluated on proper rigging selection, sponsored by Columbus McKinnon.

“Crane Institute Companies is pleased to have been invited to participate in World of Concrete’s Outdoor Events. With educational sessions, hands-on activities, and hundreds of exhibitors, this show provides something for someone in every level of a construction contractor organization,” said Headley.

Western Star, in partnership with its dealers Hoover Truck & Bus Centers and Modern Group, will supply the cranes for the Crane Operator & Rigger Skills Competition. Serving Eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware, Modern Group is supplying an Elliott 36127R boom truck mounted on a Western Star chassis for the telescopic boom crane skills competition.

A Hiab XS622 articulating boom crane, also on a Western Star chassis, is sponsored by Hoover Truck & Bus Centers, based in New Jersey. Also supporting the event is HBC Radiomatic, which will provide radio remote controls for the Knuckleboom Crane Operator Challenge.

Both cranes will be set up on SafetyTech outrigger pads provided by DICA Outrigger Pads. “SafetyTech outrigger pads are strong and rigid, provide excellent load distribution, ergonomic safety, and ease of use with any outrigger supported equipment,” said Kevin Koberg, Marketing Director for DICA.

Supported by several professional concrete contractor associations, Crane Institute of America is offering registration discounts to operators who are employed by member companies of Concrete Foundations Association, National Precast Concrete Association, Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute, and the Tilt-Up Concrete Association. Member companies should contact Eduardo Carcache to receive your discount promo code at ecarcache@craneinstitute.com.

Crane operators are encouraged to pre-register for the competition, as limited spots are available. Registration for the Crane Operator & Rigger Skills Competition is $50. Go to www.cicert.com/news/compete to register. All participants in the Crane Operator & Rigger Skills Competition must also be registered attendees of World of Concrete. To register for the show, visit www.worldofconcrete.com/Attendee/Register. The Crane Operator & Rigger Skills Competition will take place in the Gold Lot, in front of the North Hall.

About Crane Institute of America
For almost 30 years Crane Institute of America, Sanford, Fla., has offered training for operators, inspectors, safety managers, lift directors, and riggers and signalpersons working with mobile cranes, overhead cranes, tower cranes, aerial lift and forklifts. It is an authorized CIC written and practical exam testing site. For information, visit www.craneinstitute.com.

About Crane Institute Certification
Crane Institute Certification (CIC), Villa Rica, Ga., is an independent certifying organization providing OSHA recognized, NCCA and ANSI accredited certifications for mobile crane operators according to type and capacity, as well as rigger and signalperson certifications. Other programs include certifications for operators of service/mechanics trucks, articulating boom cranes, and digger derricks. CIC serves construction, utility and power generation, underground construction, manufacturing, and heavy industry. Learn more at www.cicert.com.

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Media Contact
Tracy Bennett
Mighty Mo Media Partners, LLC.
tbennett@mightymomedia.com


Preparing for OSHA Inspections

Posted on November 20, 2014 • Comments Off on Preparing for OSHA Inspections

The thought of an OSHA Compliance Office visiting a construction site may make some cringe.

OSHA released a ‘directive for enforcing requirements of the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard.’ The purpose of the directive is to give OSHA personnel a basis on how to conduct their inspections at construction sites when equipment covered by Subpart CC are present.

The items outlined below are just the minimum a Compliance Office follows during their inspection. The officer can include items in the inspection from other applicable requirements if the reason for the inspection is a fatality, compliant/referral inspection, or if a hazardous condition is present.

Notepad-OSHA checklist 800px

  1. Are ground conditions adequate, including support/foundation, matting, cribbing, blocking, etc?
  2. Is there visibly apparent need for repairs of equipment?
  3. Are nearby power lines energized; what is the voltage; what is the crane’s working area; and what are the encroachment prevention procedures?
  4. Is a signal person used and do they have documentation of qualification, electronic or physical?
  5. Is the qualified signal person the one communicating with the operator?
  6. Are lift plans being followed, if used?
  7. If hoisting personnel, who determined it was necessary?
  8. Are meetings being conducting for working near power lines, A/D work or hoisting?
  9. Is all available rigging equipment compliant?
  10. Are load charts and OEM manual’s available for the specific equipment used?
  11. Is the operator qualified, trained and competent?
  12. Are equipment and wire rope inspections being conducted; by whom; and are they qualified?
  13. Are safety devices and operational aids functioning?
  14. Are there any visual deficiencies of hoisting equipment, components and load line?
  15. How is weight of load determined?
  16. Are qualified riggers being used for A/D work and when in the fall zone?
  17. Who is the A/D Director and are they present?
  18. Are oilers and mechanics qualified; are they communicating with the operator; and are they protected in hazardous areas?
  19. Are personal fall arrest systems in compliance?

Read more form OSHA

Attend our New Lift Director/Lift Planner training program and learn who is responsible in different situations, and never worry about OSHA knocking on the door again!


Who says Lugs are a Requirement?

Posted on November 6, 2014 • Comments Off on Who says Lugs are a Requirement?

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A question posed to the Crane and Hoist Professionals group on LinkedIn asked if “Lugs” were required on underhung cranes. Most group members responded, “Yes,” because the ASME B30.11 or MH 27-1 requires it. This is not surprising because the text of many standards make them sound like they set requirements and well intended readers believe it. Let’s get technically correct:

• In the U.S., OSHA enforces the Code of Federal Regulations, for Safety and Health, with fines for non-compliance.

• In order for something to be “required” for safety and health, OSHA has to require it.

• ASME, ANSI, NFPA, NEC and other voluntary standards are only required to be followed if OSHA incorporates it.

• OSHA currently has no regulation covering underhung cranes.

• 29 CFR 1910.179 covers only top running bridge and gantry cranes.

• ASME B30.2, which is incorporated in part, covers top running cranes.

• Cranes only have to meet requirements that existed at the time of manufacture, grandfathering.

• Grandfathering and technical correctness exists until an accident.

• After an accident, OSHA can use the B30.11 lug requirement via the “general duty clause”.

• Lawyers have no rules.

• Lugs are not required on new or existing underhung cranes and employers cannot be required to install them.

• Employers must maintain a safe and healthful working environment.

•  Employers can be held liable for not complying with “voluntary” standards.

Visit our online store to purchase the current ASME B30 standards.

 


The World’s Highest Aerial Lift

Posted on October 28, 2014 • Comments Off on The World’s Highest Aerial Lift

Does it Come with a Parachute?

Ruthmann, a German-based company, brags they manufacture the world’s highest reach Aerial Lift with a distance of 328 feet. The Steiger TTS1000 is a Vehicle Mounted (trailer) Aerial Lift that is used to get personnel on tall things like wind turbines.

Reaching these kinds of elevations is possible by utilizing several features found on Telescoping Boom Cranes. The base is a telescoping boom with a telescoping luffing jib. There is a personnel basket attached to a short fixed length luffing jib. The telescoping luffing jib can be positioned in line with the telescoping boom for maximum reach. The short luffing jib can luff 180º to better position the personnel basket .

Genie and JLG are competing for the world’s highest reach Extensible (telescoping) Boom Aerial Lift at 185 feet so far. The big difference in height has to do with how the aerial lifts function. The Steiger is setup level on outriggers with a long span giving it a lot of resistance from turning over. In comparison, the Genie and JLG Industries have far less resistance to turning over because they are expected to travel around the job site and they are setup on tires.

Video Source: Ruthmann Steiger

Read more about the Steiger TTS1000 on enr.construction.com.


Right in our own Backyard

Posted on October 9, 2014 • Comments Off on Right in our own Backyard

Crane Operator AccidentKeith Bramblett, a 29 year old sign erector worker, fell 40 feet to his death when the aerial lift platform he was in ripped from the boom.

A pole designed to support a large billboard sign was being erected in Central Florida in May, using a telescoping boom crane, when somehow it fell. Bramblett was in the basket of a Vehicle-Mounted aerial lift. Despite being told not to, he tied the basket to the pole. When the pole started to fall Bramblett tried to cut the basket free of the pole which was temporarily being held up by the aerial lift. The weight of the pole was too much for the aerial lift and the basket was ripped from the boom sending it and Keith Bramblett 40 feet to the ground.

What made the billboard pole fall?
The crane didn’t overturn, so the pole must have been rigged improperly. Lifting a large pole from horizontal to vertical and aligning with the base mounting bolts is no easy trick, though the technique is well known. Rigging a large pole can be difficult if there are no weldments to attach to. Using a basket or choker hitch around the pole would not have been adequate rigging to lift it to a vertical position. If the rigging had been done improperly, the pole could have slip out of the slings.

Why was the man basket tied to the billboard pole?
Workers are required to connect their fall protection harness to a proper anchor in the basket. They’re required to only tie off the basket if they are going to get out of it at elevation, which obviously isn’t the case here. The OSHA investigation will determine why the load fell but we may never know why Bramblett tied his man basket to the pole.

Don’t let this happen to you. Crane Institute has a number of aerial lift operator training courses, as well as rigging classes to help you avoid the damage an frustration displayed above.


A ‘Tip’ about Self-Erecting Tower Cranes

Posted on September 30, 2014 • Comments Off on A ‘Tip’ about Self-Erecting Tower Cranes

Self-erecting tower cranes run the risk of tipping much like mobile cranes.

In some cases, self-erecting tower cranes are replacing mobile cranes because of their efficiency in travel and set-up. Self-erector set-up is similar to mobile crane set-up. Both require firm, level ground with extended outriggers or stabilizers. Counterweights must be installed per the manufacturer’s specification like most modern mobile cranes.

Unlike traditional tower cranes, which experience structural failure if overloaded, self-erectors are more likely to tip over. However, like mobile cranes, self-erectors are difficult to turn over because of their large structural design factors and required load chart safety margins.

Our Tower Crane Operator & Inspector covers hammerhead, luffing, and self-erecting tower cranes.

See also Flat Top Luffing Tower Crane.